De-sexing your pets before they reach sexual maturity is an important part of being a responsible pet owner as it not only prevents unwanted litters, it also protects your pet from certain health conditions and minimises potentially dangerous behaviours. At Vets in Cranbourne, recommend de-sexing dogs and cats when they are between 5-6 months old. This is slightly later than what some vets recommend but due to developmental reasons, de-sexing at this older age is better for your pet’s long-term health.

The procedure

De-sexing is a day procedure, so your pet will be admitted in the morning and discharged in the afternoon. With state of the art surgical facilities and access to both high quality pain control as well as human grade anaesthetic, Vets in Cranbourne is able to offer the highest possible standard of care and ensure your pet is as comfortable as possible.
On the morning you admit your pet, one of our nurses will go through the admission forms with you and inform you of our surgical protocols including:

  • Pre-anaesthetic blood testing
  • Intravenous fluid therapy; and
  • Anaesthetic monitoring equipment

We recommend reading our surgery preparation page to learn more about what happens when your pet is admitted for surgery with us, as well as the optional extras which can be used to ensure the best possible outcome. The nurse will confirm a discharge time with you upon admission and of course, we will let you know as soon as your pet wakes up.

Once you bring your pet home, they will need quiet rest for between 7-10 days. This means no vigorous exercise or walks, and avoid letting them jump. We will send you home with some pain control medication to ensure your pet remains comfortable in the first few days following their surgery. We will remove the stitches 10 days after surgery during a complimentary check-up. See our before and after care page to learn more about taking care of your pet after surgery.

Why de-sex your dog?

We recommend de-sexing male and female dogs before they reach sexual maturity. Although some vets perform de-sexing ad 12-16 weeks of age, we recommend performing the operation a little later, at between 5-6 months for developmental reasons. There are numerous benefits associated with de-sexing your dog including:

For female dogs:

  • No unwanted litters
  • No periods of heat (bleeding and attracting the attention of male dogs)
  • Eliminated risk of mammary tumours (breast cancer) provided the dog is de-sexed before their first season

For male dogs de-sexed before puberty:

  • Less likely to mark their territory by urinating on everything in sight
  • Less aggression towards other dogs
  • Less inclined to wander/escape
  • Reduced risk of prostate, testicular or perineal hernia problems

Why de-sex your cat?

Some of the benefits of de-sexing a male cat

  • Less spraying (urine marking)
  • Less likely to get into fights with other cats over territory
  • Reduced likelihood of developing Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (Feline AIDS)
  • Reduced likelihood of developing Feline Leukemia
  • Less likely to wander

Some of the benefits of de-sexing a female cat

  • No more periods of heat 1-2 times per month (meowing, rolling around on the floor, general restlessness)
  • Reduced risk of developing a uterus infection (pyometra)
  • Reduced likelihood of developing of breast cancer (mammary neoplasia)
  • No unwanted litters

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